Sunday, June 17, 2018

"Zero tolerance. "

TWEET ME "And whosoever shall offend one of [these] little ones that believe in me, it is better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and he were cast into the sea."  ~ Mark:42~ 

Well let's just throw all of these monsters in this administration in the sea right now.  Because they are certainly offending children in no uncertain manner.

Imagine snatching children from their families and trying to justify it by saying it's a part of some sort of political long game. Or worse, lie about it and say that it's the other guy's fault. They are calling at a "zero tolerance policy", and they have said that they do not have to justify it.  Ask yourselves this  question right-wingnuts: What would Jesus do?   

This is a new low, even for an administration that we thought could not go any lower.
You have to wonder where all of trump's religious supporters are hiding. The ones who scream bloody murder because women actually have a choice over their own bodies. They want to protect babies in the womb, but not when they actually get here. I mean even the president's wife came out of her [keep me away from Donald]cocoon long enough to say that taking children from their families is not right.  

Finally, though, America is starting to take notice. (At least those of use with a conscience. The trump cultist will say that this is all a part of the supreme leader's plan.) Hopefully the American press will stay away from trump's shiny objects that he uses to distract and focus on his everyday policies. I suppose that if enough people declare their outrage they will have no choice.  And for the record, trumpbots, it is not illegal to seek asylum. Let me repeat that: IT IS NOT ILLEGAL TO SEEK ASYLUM.

"They're willing to risk harm to a child being traumatized, separated from a parent and sitting in federal detention by themselves, in order to reach a larger policy goal of deterrence," said Jennifer Podkul, director of policy at Kids in Need of Defense, which represents children in immigration court. 

Somebody get the rope.





Saturday, June 16, 2018

Caption Saturday.

Image result for trump picture images
*

I need a caption for this pic.


*Pic from slatecom 

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Open thread.

TWEET MEDear racists, I know that you have been emboldened to let your Klan flag fly with the election of Donald trump, but you still have to be careful when in polite company. Plus, there are these things called cell phones that can document your every move. trump is giving you all a false sense of security.

This lady got away with being a flat out racist because her victims were too passive and afraid to retaliate.So did this one.  But sometimes you trumpbots have to realize that being a racist publicly isn't always a wise choice. Take this one, for instance,  he found out the hard way that you should just keep your open racism for trump rallies. Or this one, who actually got booted from college. 

Anyway, it's open thread night. Let me know what y'all think.

Tuesday, June 12, 2018

When morals go missing.

MORE DISCLAIMERSWe all know by now that Donald trump is an immoral person. He is  a man who would rather stroke the ego of a killer and a human rights abuser than the leader of a friendly nation, because said egomaniacal madman strokes his ego in return. 

trump called the leader of North Korea "strong, funny, smart", and a great negotiator whose people love him. Yeah, that same guy who has death camps disguised as prisons in his country, and who routinely starves his people to death. It's easy for a person with no morality to love a man like Kim, and it's easy to see why trump wishes that he could lead the same type of Dystopian 1984 style society like the one that now exists in North Korea. If only trump could get the American opposition and the press to obey him like the rest of his minions, life would be no doubt good in trump world. Sadly for him, though, this is America, and we still enjoy certain freedoms, that, at least for now, he cannot take away. 

Finally, speaking of morality, here is a wonderful article from Charles Blow describing what trump's campaign of bigotry has brought us. 

" Racist comments don’t hurt my feelings. Not at all.

However, I find that people assume that they are hurtful, both the persons spewing them and those empathic about the perceived pain.

But I register no such pain. I’m from the Toni Morrison school of morality on the subject of race. As she once told Charlie Rose:

'I always knew that I had the high ground, all my life. I always thought those people who said I couldn’t come in the drugstore, and I had to sit in this funny place, and I couldn’t go in the park — —”
Rose interjects:
'You felt morally superior to them from Day 1.'
Morrison continued:

'I did. And I thought they knew that I knew that they were inferior to me, morally. I always thought that, and my parents always thought that.'

You see, racism is a moral corruption built on an intellectual fallacy and exists as a construction invented for the very purpose of violence. So, when people demonstrate that they subscribe to theories of racism, they have shown their hand, and I am immediately roused by the euphoric understanding that they are compromised, diminished and assailable.

Instead of reducing me, their racism reduces them. That is the ironic, poetic justice of it.
Of course, one only has to think about it for a moment to find the enormous hole in the logic that racism morally weakens the object of the sickness rather than the possessor of the sickness.

Although it doesn’t hurt my feelings, it does enrage me when racists are granted power in society to allow their idiocy to have a negative impact on other people, whether that be culturally, psychologically and spiritually, or materially and physically.

It enrages me when ignorance is elevated and empowered, when historical truth is eschewed, when current realities are denied.

But this moral rage is separate and apart from emotional distress, the former being active and energetic while the latter is passive and plaintive.

In this context, Roseanne Barr’s recent racist tweets, including one suggesting that the Obama-era White House official Valerie Jarrett was the offspring of apes, were not emotionally injurious, but were rage-inducing.

I doubt Jarrett’s feelings were hurt because she knows, like everyone else, that even with two broken legs and rubber crutches she could run moral and intellectual rings around Barr any day of the week.
Appearing at a town hall about race on Tuesday night, Jarrett said: “I’m fine.”

Later, when asked if she agreed that Donald Trump had set a tone that has made people feel increasingly empowered to make racist statements, she said: “Tone does start at the top, and we like to look up to our president and feel as though he reflects the values of our country. But I also think every individual citizen has the responsibility too, and it’s up to all of us to push back.”

That was ever so diplomatic of Jarrett, but the blunt fact is that while racism and racists predated Trump’s presidency, he has clearly relieved a lot of the guilt and shame some may otherwise have felt about having their hatred and intolerance on display.

Trump is a walking, talking permission slip for the white supremacist.

He had the gall to tweet on Wednesday:

“Bob Iger of ABC called Valerie Jarrett to let her know that ‘ABC does not tolerate comments like those’ made by Roseanne Barr. Gee, he never called President Donald J. Trump to apologize for the HORRIBLE statements made and said about me on ABC. Maybe I just didn’t get the call?”
First, he included no condemnation of Barr’s comments at all. Failure to rebuke can rightly be taken as tacit approval and acceptance.

But then, the man who never apologizes for his growing glut of offenses wants an apology for unspecified “horrible statements” about him.

Did he apologize to the Central Park Five for calling for their executions?
Did he apologize to Barack Obama for leading the charge on the racist birther lie?
Did he apologize for calling Mexican immigrants rapists and murderers?
Did he apologize to the Muslim community for saying that Islam hates us?
Did he apologize to African countries or Haiti and El Salvador for describing them with an expletive?
Did he apologize to Colin Kaepernick and other protesting N.F.L. players for calling them sons of bitches?

No, no, no, no, no, no.

Donald Trump, White House racist, Nazi sympathizer, alt-right hero, receiver of laurels from the former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard David Duke, is the absolute last person who should be demanding an apology in this Roseanne controversy.

Barr and Trump are morally and intellectually compromised by their racial contempt. It enrages me that they have the power to influence the culture and, in Trump’s case, to actually craft toxic policy." [More here] 

And with trump comes stories like this and like this every day. (By the way, did you see the lady in that last link? Is it just me who believes that racism literally makes you uglier on the outside?) 

They were always with us folks, they just feel a little more comfortable now. 







Monday, June 11, 2018

"Little Rocket Man" is not looking so little these days.

Image result for trump kim images Tonight the American president meets with his moral twin in Singapore. They will be comparing notes on who has the worst haircut in the history of haircuts and whose hands are bigger.

I kid of course. Actually trump and his minions are touting this as the meeting of the century. To hear them tell it this meeting will change the world forever. Forget Tehran 1943, this will be bigger.  There will be no more nukes, North and South Koreans will unite, and there will be Burger King joints on every corner in Pyongyang. A trump hotel will follow soon as well.  Do they have Nobel Peace Prizes in orange?

Anywhoo, while trump is kissing up to "Little Rocket Man" , and putting on his latest dictator reality show, he seems to be on a mission to diss our friends to the North and our Allies in Europe. He even personally called out the Canadian PM in no uncertain terms. (I think he is jealous of the guy.) I mean the man (trump) really made a fool of himself at the G7.  So much so that he had other world leaders questioning his sanity; not to mention the sanity of us Americans for electing him as our president. There is this pic of him and the other leaders that says it all. To say he did Putin's bidding is is an understatement. Putin didn't have to be there, he had trump.  trump is doing his best to weaken Nato, which is exactly what Putin needs him to do. (Can I get those shower videos back now, Vlad? Not yet Donald, you still have some work to do.)

One of trump's top aides said that there is a "special place in hell" for the Canadian Prime Minister. The devil sure is slick. I never knew that hell had different kinds of places. I always thought that once you were there it was pretty much a wrap. So if that's the case, where will guys like trump and Kim Jong Un kick it in Satan's place? Rhetorical question. If you believe in such a place you have to believe that the devil will just keep them alive and force everyone there to look at their haircuts, 24/7. That is a hell that no man or woman can bear. I am sure of it.

Anyway, I found the following to be the most interesting news coming out of trump's summit.

 "South Korean news agency The Chosunilbo reported that when Kim arrived in Singapore this week on an Air China Boeing 747, he also was accompanied by an IL-76 transport plane carrying food, "his bullet-proof limousine and a portable toilet."

And accordingly to Lee Yun-keol, who worked in a North Korean Guard Command unit before defecting to South Korea in 2005, that's par for the course.

"Rather than using a public restroom, the leader of North Korea has a personal toilet that follows him around when he travels," Lee Yun-keol told the Washington Post.

The reason? They are protecting against a literal info dump.

"The leader's excretions contain information about his health status so they can't be left behind," Lee Yun-keol explained." [Source]

One could argue that trump should be bringing his own  portable toilet as well. We wouldn't want those foreign governments going through.....well, you get the idea.

*Pic from cnn.com 






Sunday, June 10, 2018

Mental health issues or racism?

TWEET MEOne of the reasons I like blogging is because I get to share interesting and informative things with you and then get your opinions and thoughts on these issues.

For instance, someone recently sent me an article from The Root, which they said infuriated them. Why? Because, they said, it was just another sad case of living while black in America, and privileged and entitled Missy resenting us being in her space.

I gotta tell you, though, I didn't see what others saw as racism. (Not like this. Now this is racism)What I saw after reading this article and watching the video, was a woman suffering from mental illness who clearly needed help. Now some would argue that racism is a form of mental illness, and I tend to agree, but the sick woman in this video would have acted the way she did no matter what the race of the people in her apartment complex.

I pity her because mental illness is real, and these spate of high profile suicides should tell us as much. Heck in my humble opinion (not mention the opinion of some real mental health professionals), your president suffers from mental illness. Watching him try to play president and make a mess of our world order ought to tell us as much. But I digress.Back to Missy with the issues in Oklahoma City.

Watch the video and tell me what you think.     


Saturday, June 09, 2018

Caption Saturday.

  • Image result for quebic g7 summit merkel german office images 
I need a caption for this pic.

Example:John Bolton-Don't you dare talk to our supreme leader like that. 
Angela Merkel-Shut up and trim your mustache, John. You look like a nineties porn star. 

*Pic from sputniknews.com

Wednesday, June 06, 2018

Open thread.

MORE DISCLAIMERSTell me what's on your mind.

I have a few things on mine.

Like Melania finally emerging from exile, and her husband telling the media that they were "vicious and unfair" to her.  I guess when he was having unprotected sex with a porn star while she recovered from giving birth to his son that wasn't "vicious and unfair".

Like this video of these cops in Arizona beating  the crap out of an innocent man for no reason.  (This is why NFL players choose to kneel.)

Like the fact that literally anything black folks do in America warrants some kind of "color aroused syndrome" type behavior.  Let's go ahead and add walking your dog while black to the list of things that will cause the cops to be called on you.

Like that incredibly impromptu press conference given by Malcolm Jenkins of the Eagles today. 

Like the Masterpiece Cakeshop case, and what it means for civil rights issues going forward in this country. 

Like the fact that trump made such a big deal about NFL players honoring the national anthem, but he himself doesn't even know the words. 

Like the fact that Karma is so real. 

Thoughts?

Tuesday, June 05, 2018

The Eagles did not land.

 
  • Image result for trump image celebration america
    "Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel"~Samuel Johnson 

Most of you read this blog know that I am a big time Eagles fan. During the football season I pretty much bleed Eagle green, and I am still pinching myself after our Super Bowl win over those New England Cheatriots. 

Now I, like most Americans, understand that it is customary for the Super Bowl champions to visit the White House to celebrate their victory with the president. I also knew this would be problematic because this particular president pretty much told NFL players to leave the country if they didn't kiss his ring, obey all his commands, and stand and sing the national anthem. (Even though he doesn't  know that words. himself) He also called their mothers bitches. Throw in the fact that the Eagles are one of the most "woke" teams in the NFL, and there is no way this was going to be easy. But, as is to be expected with this autocratic president, the Super Bowl champions were still expected to go to Washington and participate in his charade. 

To the Eagle's credit, they told the players that if they wanted to go to the White House they would be free to do so.  And some- including the team's quarterback- said that they would go. 

So the invite was on, and today was to be the day that Gang Green descends on Pennsylvania Avenue. Sadly for trump (and this is a fact), less than a dozen players agreed to go. The White House expected a lot more, and trump, who is obsessed with size, could not live with the optics of only having a few of the Super Bowl champions show up.  So what did he do? He quickly disinvited them before they showed up and embarrassed him.  But that wasn't enough. He also told a lie about the Birds and their actions during the NFL season when giving his reason for canceling the invitation. For the record, not one Eagle took a knee during the playing of the anthem, and not one stayed in the locker room. trump concocted this lie to appease his base and keep the culture war raging.

The biggest losers in this fiasco might be the NFL and the owners. trump is getting what he wants by creating this phony patriotism battle, and the owners are losing the public relations battle with their fans, as well as credibility with their players. The owner's panicked and caved to trump without consulting with the players and thinking that trump would get their back. They misread the landscape. They didn't realize that trump didn't want peace; he wanted war.  

Today the president held something called the Celebration of America, it was meant to be a patriotic event where the president can stand in front of a bunch of flags and bask in the glow of all the faux patriotism surrounding him. Of course, it didn't go as planned. A couple of protesters reminded us that we still live in America, and one wannabe dictator whose ego is almost as large as his list of crimes will not change how we live our lives.   

*Pic from theatlantic.com 


 

    




 

Sunday, June 03, 2018

"The Nationalists Delusion."

TWEET METhe field Negro education series continues.

The following essay is from Allan Serwer writing for The Atlantic.

"THIRTY YEARS AGO, nearly half of Louisiana voted for a Klansman, and the media struggled to explain why.

It was 1990 and David Duke, the former grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, astonished political observers when he came within striking distance of defeating incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator J. Bennett Johnston, earning 43 percent of the vote. If Johnston’s Republican rival hadn’t dropped out of the race and endorsed him at the last minute, the outcome might have been different.

Was it economic anxiety? The Washington Post reported that the state had “a large working class that has suffered through a long recession.” Was it a blow against the state’s hated political establishment? An editorial from United Press International explained, “Louisianans showed the nation by voting for Duke that they were mad as hell and not going to take it any more.” Was it anti-Washington rage? A Loyola University pollster argued, “There were the voters who liked Duke, those who hated J. Bennett Johnston, and those who just wanted to send a message to Washington.”

What message would those voters have been trying to send by putting a Klansman into office?
“There’s definitely a message bigger than Louisiana here,” Susan Howell, then the director of the Survey Research Center at the University of New Orleans, told the Los Angeles Times. “There is a tremendous amount of anger and frustration among working-class whites, particularly where there is an economic downturn. These people feel left out; they feel government is not responsive to them.”

Duke’s strong showing, however, wasn’t powered merely by poor or working-class whites—and the poorest demographic in the state, black voters, backed Johnston. Duke “clobbered Johnston in white working-class districts, ran even with him in predominantly white middle-class suburbs, and lost only because black Louisianans, representing one-quarter of the electorate, voted against him in overwhelming numbers,The Washington Post reported in 1990. Duke picked up nearly 60 percent of the white vote. Faced with Duke’s popularity among whites of all income levels, the press framed his strong showing largely as the result of the economic suffering of the white working classes. Louisiana had “one of the least-educated electorates in the nation; and a large working class that has suffered through a long recession,” The Post stated.

By accepting the economic theory of Duke’s success, the media were buying into the candidate’s own vision of himself as a savior of the working class. He had appealed to voters in economic terms: He tore into welfare and foreign aid, affirmative action and outsourcing, and attacked political-action committees for subverting the interests of the common man. He even tried to appeal to black voters, buying a 30-minute ad in which he declared, “I’m not your enemy.”Duke’s candidacy had initially seemed like a joke. He was a former Klan leader who had showed up to public events in a Nazi uniform and lied about having served in the Vietnam War, a cartoonishly vain supervillain whose belief in his own status as a genetic √úbermensch was belied by his plastic surgeries. The joke soon soured, as many white Louisiana voters made clear that Duke’s past didn’t bother them.

Many of Duke’s voters steadfastly denied that the former Klan leader was a racist. The St. Petersburg Times reported in 1990 that Duke supporters “are likely to blame the media for making him look like a racist.” The paper quoted G. D. Miller, a “59-year-old oil-and-gas lease buyer,” who said, “The way I understood the Klan, it’s not anti-this or anti-that.”

Duke’s rejoinder to the ads framing him as a racist resonated with his supporters. “Remember,” he told them at rallies, “when they smear me, they are really smearing you.”
The economic explanation carried the day: Duke was a freak creature of the bayou who had managed to tap into the frustrations of a struggling sector of the Louisiana electorate with an abnormally high tolerance for racist messaging.

While the rest of the country gawked at Louisiana and the Duke fiasco, Walker Percy, a Louisiana author, gave a prophetic warning to The New York Times.

“Don’t make the mistake of thinking David Duke is a unique phenomenon confined to Louisiana rednecks and yahoos. He’s not,” Percy said. “He’s not just appealing to the old Klan constituency, he’s appealing to the white middle class. And don’t think that he or somebody like him won’t appeal to the white middle class of Chicago or Queens.”

A few days after Duke’s strong showing, the Queens-born businessman Donald Trump appeared on CNN’s Larry King Live.

“It’s anger. I mean, that’s an anger vote. People are angry about what’s happened. People are angry about the jobs. If you look at Louisiana, they’re really in deep trouble,” Trump told King.
Trump later predicted that Duke, if he ran for president, would siphon most of his votes away from the incumbent, George H. W. Bush—in the process revealing his own understanding of the effectiveness of white-nationalist appeals to the GOP base.

“Whether that be good or bad, David Duke is going to get a lot of votes. Pat Buchanan—who really has many of the same theories, except it's in a better package—Pat Buchanan is going to take a lot of votes away from George Bush,” Trump said. “So if you have these two guys running, or even one of them running, I think George Bush could be in big trouble.” Little more than a year later, Buchanan embarrassed Bush by drawing 37 percent of the vote in New Hampshire’s Republican primary.
In February 2016, Trump was asked by a different CNN host about the former Klan leader’s endorsement of his Republican presidential bid.

“Well, just so you understand, I don’t know anything about David Duke. Okay?,” Trump said. “I don’t know anything about what you’re even talking about with white supremacy or white supremacists. So I don’t know.”

ess than three weeks before the 2016 presidential election, Donald Trump declared himself “the least racist person you have ever met.”
Even before he won, the United States was consumed by a debate over the nature of his appeal. Was racism the driving force behind Trump’s candidacy? If so, how could Americans, the vast majority of whom say they oppose racism, back a racist candidate?

During the final few weeks of the campaign, I asked dozens of Trump supporters about their candidate’s remarks regarding Muslims and people of color. I wanted to understand how these average Republicans—those who would never read the neo-Nazi website The Daily Stormer or go to a Klan rally at a Confederate statue—had nevertheless embraced someone who demonized religious and ethnic minorities. What I found was that Trump embodied his supporters’ most profound beliefs—combining an insistence that discriminatory policies were necessary with vehement denials that his policies would discriminate and absolute outrage that the question would even be asked.

It was not just Trump’s supporters who were in denial about what they were voting for, but Americans across the political spectrum, who, as had been the case with those who had backed Duke, searched desperately for any alternative explanation—outsourcing, anti-Washington anger, economic anxiety—to the one staring them in the face. The frequent postelection media expeditions to Trump country to see whether the fever has broken, or whether Trump’s most ardent supporters have changed their minds, are a direct outgrowth of this mistake. These supporters will not change their minds, because this is what they always wanted: a president who embodies the rage they feel toward those they hate and fear, while reassuring them that that rage is nothing to be ashamed of.

“I believe that everybody has a right to be in the United States no matter what your color, no matter what your race, your religion, what sex you prefer to be with, so I’m not against that at all, but I think that some of us just say racial statements without even thinking about it,” a customer-care worker named Pam—who, like several people I spoke with, declined to give her last name—told me at a rally in Pennsylvania. However, she also defended Trump’s remarks on race and religion explicitly when I asked about them. “I think the other party likes to blow it out of proportion and kind of twist his words, but what he says is what he means, and it’s what a lot of us are thinking.”

Most Trump supporters I spoke with were not people who thought of themselves as racist. Rather, they saw themselves as antiracist, as people who held no hostility toward religious and ethnic minorities whatsoever—a sentiment they projected onto their candidate.

“I don’t feel like he’s racist. I don’t personally feel like anybody would have been able to do what he’s been able to do with his personal business if he were a horrible person,” Michelle, a stay-at-home mom in Virginia, told me.

Far more numerous and powerful than the extremists in Berkeley and Charlottesville who have drawn headlines since Trump’s election, these Americans, who would never think of themselves as possessing racial animus, voted for a candidate whose ideal vision of America excludes millions of fellow citizens because of their race or religion.

The specific dissonance of Trumpism—advocacy for discriminatory, even cruel, policies combined with vehement denials that such policies are racially motivated—provides the emotional core of its appeal. It is the most recent manifestation of a contradiction as old as the United States, a society founded by slaveholders on the principle that all men are created equal.

While other factors also led to Trump’s victory—the last-minute letter from former FBI Director James Comey, the sexism that rationalized supporting Trump despite his confession of sexual assault, Hillary Clinton’s neglect of the Midwest—had racism been toxic to the American electorate, Trump’s candidacy would not have been viable.

Nearly a year into his presidency, Trump has reneged or faltered on many of his biggest campaign promises—on renegotiating NAFTA, punishing China, and replacing the Affordable Care Act with something that preserves all its popular provisions but with none of its drawbacks. But his commitment to endorsing state violence to remake the country into something resembling an idealized past has not wavered.

He made a farce of his populist campaign by putting bankers in charge of the economy and industry insiders at the head of the federal agencies established to regulate their businesses. But other campaign promises have been more faithfully enacted: his ban on travelers from Muslim-majority countries; the unleashing of immigration-enforcement agencies against anyone in the country illegally regardless of whether he poses a danger; an attempt to cut legal immigration in half; and an abdication of the Justice Department’s constitutional responsibility to protect black Americans from corrupt or abusive police, discriminatory financial practices, and voter suppression. In his own stumbling manner, Trump has pursued the race-based agenda promoted during his campaign. As the president continues to pursue a program that places the social and political hegemony of white Christians at its core, his supporters have shown few signs of abandoning him.

One hundred thirty-nine years since Reconstruction, and half a century since the tail end of the civil-rights movement, a majority of white voters backed a candidate who explicitly pledged to use the power of the state against people of color and religious minorities, and stood by him as that pledge has been among the few to survive the first year of his presidency. Their support was enough to win the White House, and has solidified a return to a politics of white identity that has been one of the most destructive forces in American history. This all occurred before the eyes of a disbelieving press and political class, who plunged into fierce denial about how and why this had happened. That is the story of the 2016 election." [More] 

We have gone from David Duke to Donald trump, and nothing much has changed when it comes to racism and politics in America. In fact, if we are going to be honest, things have gotten worse. How do you explain incidents like this happening over and over again? 

trump, to his credit, knows his base, and he knows that the only thing that will keep them loyal to him--- no matter what is if he keeps blowing those racial dog whistles like his ideological soulmate (David Duke) did years ago. 


Saturday, June 02, 2018

CAPTION SATURDAY.

  • Image result for trump kardashian image
I need a caption for this pic. 

*Pic from nbcnews.com